The Merchant Of Venice Tickets : The Play Is Perhaps Most Remembered For Its Dramatic Scenes

The Merchant of Venice is a tragic comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1596 and 1598. Though classified as a tragic comedy in the First Folio and sharing certain aspects with Shakespeare’s other romantic comedies, the play is perhaps most remembered for its dramatic scenes, and is best known for Shylock and the famous ‘pound of flesh’ speech.

The title character is the merchant Antonio, not the Jewish moneylender Shylock, who is the play’s most prominent and most famous character. This is made explicit by the title page of the first quarto: The most excellent Historie of the Merchant of Venice. With the extreame crueltie of Shylock the Iewe towards the sayd Merchant, in cutting a iust pound of his flesh: and the obtayning of Portia by the choyse of three chests.

The date of composition for The Merchant of Venice is believed to be between 1596 and 1598. The play was mentioned by Francis Meres in 1598, so it must have been familiar on the stage by that date, and the title page of the first edition in 1600 states that it had been performed “divers times” by that date.

Salarino’s reference to his ship the “Andrew” (I,i,27) is thought to be an allusion to the Spanish ship St. Andrew captured by the English at Cadiz in 1596. A date of 1596/97 is considered consistent with the play’s style.

The play was entered in the Register of the Stationers Company, the method at that time of obtaining copyright for a new play, by James Roberts on July 22, 1598 under the title The Merchant of Venice, otherwise called The Jew of Venice.

On October 28, 1600 Roberts transferred his right to the play to the stationer Thomas Hayes; Hayes published the first quarto before the end of the year. It was printed again in a pirated edition in 1619, as part of William Jaggard’s so-called False Folio. (Afterward, Thomas Hayes’ son and heir Laurence Hayes asked for and was granted a confirmation of his right to the play, on July 8, 1619.)

The 1600 edition is generally regarded as being accurate and reliable, and is the basis of the text published in the 1623 First Folio, which adds a number of stage directions, mainly musical cues.

The earliest performance of which a record has survived was held at the court of King James in the spring of 1605, followed by a second performance a few days later, but there is no record of any further performances in the seventeenth century.In 1701, George Granville staged a successful adaptation, titled The Jew of Venice, with Thomas Betterton as Bassanio. This version was popular, and was acted for the next forty years.

Granville cut the Gobbos in line with neoclassical decorum; he added a jail scene between Shylock and Antonio, and a more extended scene of toasting at a banquet scene. Thomas Doggett was Shylock, playing the role comically, perhaps even farcically.

In 1741 Charles Macklin returned to the original text in a very successful production at Drury Lane, paving the way for Edmund Kean seventy years later (see below).Arthur Sullivan wrote incidental music for the play in 1871.

Cynthia Hoffman is the author of Ticketwood.com . Ticketwood is a leader tickets market search engine that enable Ticket shoppers to easily find, compare and buy The Merchant Of Venice Tickets sports tickets, theatre tickets Theater Tickets plus other events tickets.

Related Beach Invitations Articles

Leave a Reply